one of the bosses at Ahu Tongariki, you can still see his hands
a large moai head and his red pukao hat at Ahu Akahanga
the rocks at Orongo all have petroglyphs depicting Birdmen and the god Make Make
the ritual complex at Orongo, the center for the birdman Culture
inside the cave there are murals related to the birdman Culture
the moai at Ahu Nau Nau near Anakena Beach are very well preserved
inside the Rano Raraku volcano is a lake and more moai
this is Tukuturi, the only kneeling moai
some of the moai at the slope of the Rano Raraku quarry. 60% of the body is below ground
the platform at Ahu Tahiri bears an eerie resemblance to the way the Inca build their walls
Easter Island Highlights
Easter Island's main features are the large statues, called moai erected on ceremonial platforms called Ahu. Almost all moai have their back turned to the sea.
The moais were carved from the tuffstone quarry at Rano Ranaku, their reddish headdresses came from the Puna Pau quarry.
 
For unknown reasons by mid 19th century the locals had toppled all moai. In the same period the competitive Birdman Culture emerged with Orongo as its ceremonial center. 
 
There are dozens of platforms scattered around the rugged shoreline, several have been excavated and restored.
 
The most imposing one is Ahu Tongariki, its platform with 15 massive moais is well over 200 meters long. 
The tallest moai, called Paro, is the one at Te Pito Kura.  With a height of 10 meters and a weight of 70 tons, Paro still lies with his nose buried in the ground, his neck broken. But once he to will be repaired and ressurected in full glory.
 
There are some 500 unfinished moais at the Rano Raraku quarry, the best place for signature pictures of Easter Island..
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Ahu Tahai: moai Ko Te Riku has his eyes back and proudly wears the pukao on his head
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these stairs lead to the "cannibal cave" at Ana Kai Tangata
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the craterlake of the Rano Kau volcano
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the imposing moai of Ahu Tongariki
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the 7 moai of Ahu Akivi are sometimes called the seven explorers of the first king Hotu Matu’a
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a stargazer at One Mahiki
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